16

I have been merrily hitting up GOG sale after GOG sale because that’s how they get you. Replaying Lands of Lore put me in the fuzziest of moods–it was one of my favorites when I played it in middle school. And yet something about games where you, first-person, navigate a dank dungeon has always left me cold. PC RPGs in general have always been daunting. I’ve never liked Ultima, had a lot of trouble with one of the Might and Magic games that came with my computer in fifth grade, and I’m absolutely hopeless at playing Infinity Engine-style stuff.

So I’ve been taking this opportunity to educate myself–I’m still eyeing that Might and Magic 6-pack to complete the pagkage, and I’ll eventually be writing about a lot of what I’ve purchased from the sale–but the one that’s hooked me the most has been Wizardry 6, which is actually not a sale item and which I picked up because my silly head told me to.

Knowing me, you would think that my initial impression of the game would be I’d get hopelessly lost in the character creator, wander around for about ten minutes, then get myself killed by a bat and turn off the game and go to sleep, and that’s exactly what happened. Shit, I thought, well that was a waste of six bucks.

The next day I bought a pad of graph paper and colored pencils, sat down, began to map, and didn’t look up till about three hours later when I had to go to band practice. After practice, I played the game until I passed out, woke up early, played some more, and guess what I’m going to do once I finish this piece of writing.

I’ve actually never played a game where I’ve had to make my own maps. Any first-person games I’ve played have always had an automap feature. And yet this is what’s fascinating me about it the most. The game takes place not solely in the screen but in a weird hybrid of the pad of paper on my table and the screen. I’ve played plenty of games which require taking notes, of course, but few which have required such a dedication to its level design. And so far, the game has been extraordinarily rewarding on that front. The very first level is huge–I’ve logged eight separate floors so far and I’m not even finished–but what’s particularly striking about it is how logically laid out it is. You could build this–stacking the map pages together almost makes a 3-d model. The manual mapping forces an intimacy with the level design that an automap simply doesn’t have. And particularly coming off of Lands of Lore and Legend of Grimrock which, while both wonderful games are mazes first and buildings second, it’s one of those games that breaks your fucking heart when you realize that Skyrim is its descendant.

I’m playing in Easy mode, but I’m finding the combat at least to be very straightforward. One of the reasons I was interested in Wizardry was because it’s generally credited, along with Ultima, with inspiring Dragon Quest, and I am a huge Dragon Quest fan. While Dragon Quest has always featured third-person dungeons, its battle system and Wizardry’s are almost exactly the same. There’s some divergent evolution going on–I can discuss, from memory, the development of Dragon Quest’s battle system from the first through the ninth, and if there’s anyone who can do that for the Wizardry series, please let me know so we can have a hopelessly pathetic conversation together that both of us will find fascinating–but they’re brothers.

I fully expect the game to get very difficult soon.

And yet the game is giving an extreme sense of freedom. I’m very slowly discovering more and more features. I’ve just figured out how to pick locks. Suddenly entire areas of the castle are opening up to me. I still don’t know where the hell to go right now, but I feel very at ease sifting through map pages.

I kind of missed this era of computing–I was just too young for it—but have always felt like it was something special. I’ve read posts by people who imported their characters from game to game over a decade. People who still hold on to yellowed Ultima maps. It’s funny; Wizardry 6’s manual bills the game as a “fantasy role-playing simulation” rather than simply as a game, and there’s all this nonsense in the first pages about how the game’s actually a magic portal to another land. It’s cheesy as shit but I totally get it. There’s a richness to the game’s systems, even now and especially for the time, a complexity which I find very respectful. Really, the game is providing further context to the maps, which are mitigated in my head in the form of a working picture of the castle which is more detailed than either could be on their own. Most of the things you see in the castle’s rooms are text descriptions. I don’t need to go into the role of the imagination and the Iconic again.

Anyway, I feel that this is a journey I would like to complete because, in many ways, it symbolizes a particular resolve to become a particular sort of gamer. I’m tired of gaming like a little kid; Wizardry 6 is serious shit.

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3 thoughts on “16

  1. Okay, I think my first comment was somehow eaten up- I’ll try this again.

    I’m not sure if you’ll even see this, but I just wanted to express my appreciation for this blog. Specifically your posts on Wizardry 6 and Might and Magic have resonated with me. In fact, I’ve gone out and bought a graph paper notebook specially for the purpose of playing Might and Magic 1- inspired by you and the cRPG addict. But I’ve been coming back to this blog for a while now- like two years at least- just to read your comments and journeys through these games, and I find them to be very well thought out. After I am done with Might and Magic, I want to play through Wizardry 6-8 too. I love the idea of the consistently scaled castle that you described.
    Anyways, I wasn’t sure where to leave this comment, but I figured it would be kind of poetic to post it on your first entry on Wizardry 6. With any luck, I’ll make it as far as you did on these games.

    • I guess this is a sign I should blog more ;) I am really happy to hear you’re getting into Wiz and MM–I hope you’re enjoying it!

      I didn’t really blog my journeys through Wizardry 7-8, which was probably a mistake on my part, but they’re both fascinating ones. It’s totally legit, particularly in 6-7, to use the guide that comes with the GoG release–they’re very esoteric games in a lot of ways, with certain puzzles being vague or dependent on items you can overlook, but don’t get scared, because they’re also very flexible systems where you *can* hone some OP characters.

      Do you know about Grimoire? It’s taken over 20 years to make so no one believes it’ll actually be released, but they’re threatening a next week release and it might happen!

      • Hey, I would love to see some more posts from you! Playing games from the late 80s- early 90s can definitely feel like a chore sometimes, but its definitely satisfying, and seeing your maps come together on paper is pretty great.
        And yeah, I’ve been following the whole Grimoire thing; it will definitely be interesting to see- if it happens.

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